When students can connect an experience they’re having on the mat to something happening off the mat and gain perspective, that’s the practice. That is why I teach.

When I was a senior in college, I took my first yoga class and experienced an interesting paradox: I felt completely at home doing something I’d never done before. I started going to class regularly, fueled by an intuitive feeling that yoga was preparing or perhaps even training me for something. I wasn’t quite sure what it was, but I continued to practice.

That something, I would come to find out later on, was life. Yoga is how I train for, prepare for, and practice, life.

When I enrolled in teacher training, I didn’t have a specific intention beyond knowing it was the next right step. I’d been fired from a high-powered fashion marketing job and was burnt out from the turbulent first half of my twenties. I knew it was time to try something different.

I completed training in Anusara yoga, an alignment-focused style of yoga based on a positive philosophy. My teacher introduced me to the realm of yoga philosophy, a discipline that has completely changed the way I understand and experience life.

My intention as a yoga teacher is to offer lessons from yoga philosophy that apply to my students’ lives on and off the mat. My classes guide students to practice svadhaya, the Sanksrit word for self-study, on and off their mats.¬†When they can connect an experience they’re having on the mat to something happening off the mat and gain perspective, that’s the practice. That is why I teach.

My mission is to hold space for her students as they grow in their practice, self-awareness, and lives. I am grateful to be able to teach the wisdom of yoga in my weekly Portland classes, private sessions, corporate sessions, and through my weekly podcast Yoga Chit Chat.